Clinical Scenario
A 40 yo lady arrives in ED by ambulance with neck and spinalimmobilization because she fell down a staircare.

 The patient’s vital signs are within normal physiological parameters, sheis alert, no deficit, remembers all, denies head contusion and neck pain.She complains for a sharp shoulder pain (NRS 10/10), it seems broken.
If I perform the Nexus C-Spine criteria  X Ray is indicated: a distractinginjury mandates cervical spine imaging.

How much the presence of distracting injury reduces my sensibility in rule out cervical spine (c-spine) injury?

 

Conclusion
 

 

Once upon a time nearly all patients who presented in ED with blunt trauma received a cervical spine X-Ray. Theclinicians feared to undiagnosed a cervical fracture, with catastrophic consequences for the patients
and than for thesame doctor, so there were a large number of unnecessary films. The Nexus five criteria simplified our work: it’s easy and speedy and especially is high sensitive to rule out a cervical spine injury. The presence of a distracting injury has anegligible impact.
Is it time to define the Nexus four criteria?
Bibliography
MK Rose
Clinical clearance of the cervical spine in patients with distracting injuries: it is time to dispel the myth.
J Trauma 2012 vol 73 n 2 pag 498-502.
A Kostantininidis
The presence of a nonthoracic distracting injuries does not affect the initial clinical examination
of the cervicalspine in evaluable blunt trauma patients: a prospective observational study.
J Trauma Sept 2011 vol 71 n 3.

Paucis Verbis: distracting injuries in c-spine injuries from Academic Life In Emergency Medicine Sept 2011.

Ciro Paolillo

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>